Sexology and the Media

Sexology and sexual matters are often in the news. We hear about recent developments in our understanding od sexuality and improved methods and techniques to address sexual difficulties.

Unfortunately from time to time we also hear about problems with  services and allegations of misconduct against “sexologists”.

SASH, once again, wishes to bring the following to the attention of the public:

The South African Sexual Health Association is a voluntary, multidisciplinary, participation association of health care practitioners, practicing in sexual medicine/health, within the parameters of their respective professions. Membership is restricted to Practitioners registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa which is a statutory regulatory and disciplinary body, tasked with the maintenance of academic standards within the profession and the protection of the public.

The South African Sexual Health Association exists ti assist in the ongoing professional development of its members anf to inform the public on sexual matters.

For the benefit of the public SASHA wishes to highlight the following:

  1. There is no accredited specialisation in South Africa in sexual medicine or sexology
  2. There is no SAQA accredited training in Sexual Medicine – Prospective students of sexology please read the press release from HPCSA.
  3. Members of SASHA who practice in the field of sexology, do so within the ambit of their registered professional qualifications, and many have received post graduate training in sexology from overseas institutions.
  4. Members of the public, when seeking assistance for sexual conditions are strongly advised to check the credentials of the person they seek to consult, by checking on their membership with SASHA and with the Health Professions Council of South Africa here

What are Sexual Rights

We currently have one of the highest rates of HIV/AIDS infections in the world, which is an indication that we still have a lot of work to do in the promotion of sexual rights in our country. The following list of sexual rights have been adapted from the Universal Declaration of Sexual Rights from the World Association for Sexology (www.worldsexology.org)

  1.  The right to sexual freedom:
    This is the right to achieve your full sexual potential without any coercion , exploitation and abuse.
  2. The right to sexual autonomy, sexual integrity, and safety of the sexual body:
    This is the right to make your own decisions about your sex life based on your personal beliefs and ethics. It recognises your right to enjoy your sexuality without the fear of violence and manipulation by others.
  3.  The right to sexual privacy:
    This is your right to choose what sexual behaviours and relationships you want as long as they do not violate the sexual rights of others.
  4. The right it sexual equality:
    This is the freedom to enjoy your sexuality without the fear of discrimination.
  5. The right to sexual pleasure :
    This should not infringe the rights of anyone else.
  6.  The right to emotional sexual expression:
    People have a right to express their sexuality through communication, touch, emotional expression and love.
  7. The right to establish and dissolve sexual relationships:
    This includes the right to decide to marry or not, to divorce or to establish any other reasonable sexual relationship.
  8. The right to make free and responsible reproductive choices:
    This is the right to decide whether or not to have children, how many to have, how to space them and what contraception to use.
  9. The right to Scientifically Accurate Information on Sex:
    This is the right to access appropriate scientifically  accurate information and implies that you have the right to be protected from misleading information in any form.
  10. The right to sex education:
    This is the right to receive sex education that is accurate, age appropriate, and understandable to you.
  11. The Right to sexual health Services:
    This is the right to access healthcare practitioners for contraception, treatment of sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS and for any other sexual problems.