Sexology is the scientific study of human sexuality, including human sexual interests, behaviors and function. The term sexology does not generally refer to the non-scientific study of sexuality, such as political science or social criticism.

Sexologists apply tools from several academic fields, such as biology, medicine, psychology, social work, epidemiology and criminology. Topics of study include sexual development (puberty), sexual orientation and gender identity, sexual relationships and sexual activity, paraphilia’s and atypical sexual interests, as well as the sexualities of special groups, such as child sexuality, adolescent sexuality, sexuality among the elderly and the disabled. The sexological study of sexual dysfunctions and disorders, including erectile dysfunction, anorgasmia, hypoactive sexual desire disorders, sexual pain disorder, sexual arousal disorders and delayed ejaculation are also mainstays.

Sexologist is a registered social worker or psychologist with further training and qualification in Sexology as defined above.

Medical Sexologist: A medical doctor with further training and qualification in the area of sexual health and illness.

Sex therapy is a strategy for the treatment of sexual dysfunction when there is no medical etiology (physiological reason) or as a complement to medical treatment. The sexual dysfunctions which may be addressed by sex therapy include non-consummation, premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, low libido, unwanted sexual fetishes, sexual addiction, painful sex, or a lack of sexual confidence, assisting people who are recovering from sexual assault, problems commonly caused by stress, tiredness, and other environmental and relationship factors. Sex therapists assist those experiencing problems in overcoming them, in doing so possibly regaining an active sex life.

Sex therapy is a form of psychotherapy. Sex therapists assist those experiencing problems in overcoming them, in doing so possibly regaining an active sex life. The practice of sex therapy remains controversial. It is approached with ambivalence in social, religious, and educational systems. The transformative approach to sex therapy aims to understand the psychological, biological, pharmacological, relational, and contextual aspects of sexual problems.

Sex therapy requires rigorous evaluation that includes a medical and psychological examination. The reason is that sexual dysfunction may have a somatic base or a psychogenic basis. A clear example is erectile dysfunction (sometimes still called “impotence”), whose etiology may include, firstly, circulatory problems, and secondly, performance anxiety. Sex therapy is frequently short term, with duration depending on the causes for therapy.

Sex Therapists are registered mental health professionals, trained to provide in-depth psychotherapy, who have specialized in treating clients with sexual issues and concerns. Sex therapists work with simple sexual concerns also, but in addition, where appropriate, are prepared to provide comprehensive and intensive psychotherapy over an extended period of time in more complex cases. Sex therapy can be provided by registered social workers, medical doctors or psychologists who have undergone specialized training in sex therapy.

Sex education is instruction on issues relating to human sexuality, including human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexual activity, reproductive health, emotional relations, reproductive rights and responsibilities, sexual abstinence, and birth control. Common avenues for sex education are parents or caregivers, formal school programs, and public health campaigns.

Sexuality Educators teach and train about a range of topics, including but not limited to sexual health; sexual and reproductive anatomy and physiology; family planning, contraception, and pregnancy/childbirth; sexually transmitted infections; gender identity and roles; gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues; sexual function and dysfunction; sexual pleasure; sexual variation; sexuality and disability; sexuality and chronic illness; sexual development across the lifespan; sexual abuse, assault, and coercion; and sexuality across cultures. Sexuality educators may teach in the classroom at the elementary, secondary, and higher education levels. They may also provide education for groups of children, adolescents, or adults, training for professionals, and outreach and education in community-based, healthcare, corporate, and faith-based settings. Sexuality educators also may design and conduct workshops, courses, and seminars; contribute to the sexuality education literature, develop curriculum; plan and administer programs; deliver lectures and provide one-on-one client education sessions.

Sex Counsellors assist the client to realistically resolve concerns through the introduction of problem solving techniques of communication as well as providing accurate information and relevant suggestions of specific exercises and techniques in sexual expression. Sexuality counselling is generally short term and client centered, focusing on the immediate concern or problem. Sexuality counsellors are trained to identify situations that require intensive therapy and to make appropriate referrals.